2018 Honda Accord

2018 Honda Accord

Episode 3713 , Episode 3730
Auto Value and Bumper to BumperTire Rack "The Way Tire Buying Should Be"

An accord by definition is an agreement. And I think we can all agree that the Honda Accord has been one of the most successful cars of all time, with over 13 million sold here in the U.S. alone. So while an all-new Accord may not spike the excitement meter around here, it certainly is an important vehicle for Honda, as well as for other car makers, as they see what they’ll be up against for years to come. 

Sedan sales being what they are these days, you might think Honda would just do a light makeover for the 2018 Honda Accord and call it a year. That’s not the case. 

This 10th generation Accord is all-new, riding on a lighter chassis that allows for a lower, wider stance. 

Wheelbase is up by over two inches, with virtually all of it upping rear leg roof. There’s genuine full-size sedan space back here, and while the sloping room means really bending over to get in, there’s 6-footer-plus headroom once you do.

Up front, Honda has blended a sportier theme into the familiar space; starting with a nicely thick steering wheel, and adding additional bolstering to the seats.

The gauge panel is virtual, but there are dials here, not just a digital readout for speed like some other Hondas. 

A full slate of tech. features naturally, including an 8-inch touchscreen with vastly improved interface; though that’s mostly due to adding some antiquated knobs and buttons back into the mix. 

On the practicality front, split folding seatbacks are standard, and trunk space increases by almost a full cubic-ft. to 16.7. 

There’s lots new in the powertrain department as well. Base, and destined to be the most popular, is a 1.5-liter turbo-4, which at 192-horsepower, is the most ever standard in an Accord; torque is 192 lb-ft. It comes mated to either a CVT or a 6-speed manual transmission. For a small turbo, it operates very smoothly, and feels totally adequate for daily use. 

The upgrade is no longer a V6, but another turbo-4, a 2.0-liter no less. But don’t fret, it’s actually a detuned version of the Civic Type R’s, cranking out 252-horsepower, with 273 lb-ft. of torque, more than the last V6. It connects to either a new 10-speed automatic or a 6-speed manual. 

We really enjoyed the manual. It’s not Honda’s best shifter ever, but it just feels like you’re getting away with something, rowing through the gears in this family car.

Finally, the hybrid makes a return as well, combining a normally-aspirated 2.0-liter I4 with two electric motors for a combined output of 212-horsepower.

Regardless of powertrain, the Accord feels as quiet and functional as always, but bigger, and still with just a dash of fun in the mix. It’s not Lexus quiet, or Mazda capable, but it finds a really nice sweet spot in between. 

While visibility wasn’t an issue before, A-pillars have been slimmed to enhance the outward view further. 

Despite the wheelbase stretch, overall length is actually down, even as the front overhang is up slightly.

But, the altered proportions work wonderfully, yielding a sleeker, coupe-like, profile. Indeed, Honda clearly wanted to steer things in a sportier direction styling-wise; but thankfully without going overboard.

A bit of weight was lost along the way as well, around 150-lbs for most trim levels. Wheels are 17 or 19-inch alloys.

Most of our time, both at the national press launch in New Hampshire and around our headquarters, was spent in a Touring trim Accord with the optional 2.0-liter and 10-speed automatic. New is an Adaptive Damper system with real-time damping control with Normal and Sport modes. 

Despite all of the gears, the transmission displayed only the occasional clunkiness.

And at our unfortunately frigid test track, the 2.0T-10 speed combo still delivered; with a 0-60 of 6.5-seconds. There’s plenty of low-end rumble, enough to battle quite a bit of wheel spin. With warmer temps, we feel sub-6 seconds would be more the order of the day.

Things are smooth and steady from there, eventually tripping the lights in 14.8-seconds at 100 miles-per-hour. Easily comparable to last year’s V6. 

It doesn’t feel vastly lighter than before, but nimbler for sure with noticeably less body roll. Turn-ins are quicker and overall the car simply feels more responsive, and yes sportier!  

Honda Sensing safety systems, including Collision Mitigation Braking are standard on all Accords. 

Government Fuel Economy Ratings aren’t finalized for the 2.0-liter, but in mixed driving we averaged a good 28.6 miles-per-gallon on Regular.  

Pricing starts with LX trim at $24,445; top level Touring trim begins at $34,675.  

Yes, it’s not a great time to be in the 4-door car business these days; but if there’s one sedan that should have no problem staying relevant in this SUV obsessed world, it’s the 2018 Honda Accord. It’s because it still delivers what it always has; reliable, highly efficient, practical, trouble-free transportation in an increasingly refined and sophisticated package. Honda fans are sure to follow… Accordingly.  

Specifications

  • Engine: 1.5 liter / 2.0 liter
  • Horsepower: 192 / 252
  • Torque: 192 lb-ft. / 273 lb-ft.
  • 0-60 mph: 6.5 seconds
  • 1/4 mile: 14.8 seconds @ 100 mph
  • EPA: Average 28.6 mpg
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 3/4 Front

2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge

Big Changes for Volvo’s Smallest SUV

Episode 4337
Auto Value and Bumper to BumperTire Rack "The Way Tire Buying Should Be"

Volvo’s march towards full electrification is well underway, and it doesn’t look like anything will stop it. Now, there are currently four fully-electric SUVs you can reserve on their website. However, only two have made it onto our streets here in the U.S. including their first EV, the XC40 Recharge. Which, as it turns out, continues to get better and better.

The 2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge started out as just the plain old XC40 back in 2019. It then acquired the Recharge signifier in 2021 when it became the brand’s first full battery-electric vehicle here in the U.S., not to be confused with the XC40 Recharge PHEV… Plug-In Hybrid… which unfortunately is not sold here.
Got all that? Good, let’s talk about what has changed recently to make the XC40 Recharge EV better than ever.

It may look mostly the same as when we last saw it back in 2021, but it did get some styling tweaks last year, and underneath that skin, and all the vegan and recycled materials, are some big changes for 20-24.
Foremost is a bigger battery. It comes in a new two-wheel-drive version of the XC40. Up to now, all XC40 Recharges have been all-wheel drive. With just a single 185 kilowatt motor rated at 248 horsepower and 310 lb-ft of torque and a larger 82 kilowatt-hour battery pack, range jumps from the previous max of 223 miles to 293.

2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dead Front
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 3/4 Front
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Headlight
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Volvo Badge
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Profile
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Profile
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Stamped Name
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 3/4 Rear
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dead Rear
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Taillight
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Badge
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dead Front2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 3/4 Front2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Headlight2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Volvo Badge2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Profile2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Profile2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Stamped Name2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 3/4 Rear2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dead Rear2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Taillight2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Badge

Now, we put it to the test on a cold and rainy spring day, and fell well short of that max number. But our pace of 251-miles, at the end of our driving loop, was still a significant improvement.

Twin-motor all-wheel-drive XC40s keep the same 78 kilowatt-hour battery as before, but also take advantage of that new rear motor, as well as get an upgraded front motor too. New software treats that front motor as more of a traction assist to be used only when needed.

Power built more gradually, more like a traditional ICE powertrain. We’ve been seeing that approach from other EV makers recently as well, and we’re onboard with that.

So, range is up for it too, now rated at 254 miles. Full one-pedal driving is also included. XC40s with the extended range battery have a charging upgrade too, now taking up to 200-kilowatt DC fast charging for an 80% charge in 28 minutes.

As for charging off the starting line at our test track, it certainly didn’t have the rush of acceleration that the twin-motor displays. Power built more gradually, more like a traditional ICE powertrain. We’ve been seeing that approach from other EV makers recently as well, and we’re onboard with that.

2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dashboard
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Steering Wheel
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Central Display
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Volume Knob
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Digital Cluster
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Central Display Alt
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Shifter
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Front Seat
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 7
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Seat
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Climate
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Trunk
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Harmon Kardon Speaker
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Door Interior
2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Dashboard2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Steering Wheel2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Central Display2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Volume Knob2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Digital Cluster2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Central Display Alt2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Shifter2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Front Seat2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge 72024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Seat2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Rear Climate2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Trunk2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Harmon Kardon Speaker2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge Door Interior

Once full power did arrive, we hit 60 in a still quite quick 6.4 seconds; and power delivery stayed strong throughout the quarter-mile instead of tapering off like many EVs do. The full quarter-mile catapult ended in 15.2 seconds at 92 miles-per-hour.

Volvo has also tweaked the suspension to provide a smoother ride on the street, but with the same low center of gravity as before, combined with rear-wheel drive, the XC40 Recharge felt more than capable through our handling course.

Nothing really changes inside. All occupants are met with a pretty plush yet very practical design. That means great materials, good comfort front and rear, and Volvo’s Google-based infotainment system.

XC40 Recharges are available in 3 trim levels: Core, Plus, and Ultimate, with all three now available in either rear or all-wheel drive. With the Twin Motor now essentially a $1,750 option, prices range from the base Single Motor Core’s $53,745 to top Twin Motor Ultimate at $61,845.

With a comprehensive powertrain and drivetrain makeover, the 2024 Volvo XC40 Recharge accomplishes more than just offering more range and more options for buyers, it has become a more compelling EV choice than ever.

Specifications

As Tested

  • Motor Setup: single rear (185-kW)
  • Battery Size: 82-kWh
  • Horsepower: 248
  • Torque: 310 lb-ft.
  • EPA Range: 293 Miles
  • 0-60 mph: 6.4 seconds
  • 1/4 Mile: 15.2 seconds at 92 mph
  • 60-0 Braking: 116 feet (avg)
  • MW Range: 252 Miles
  • Efficiency: 32 kWh/100 miles